Game 136: DET vs. NYY — A 2-hit wonder

The funny thing about baseball is that for all its statistics and numbers, it really just boils down to a lone stat — runs scored. Everything else ultimately is either for individual glory (or detriment). And this afternoon’s game in the Bronx was a great example of that. The Yankees, who ultimately won the game, only got 2 hits and 5 walks, while the Tigers worked 9 hits and just 1 walk off Yankee pitchers. The difference was simple — the Yankees scored just one more run and thus won the game.

Still, Masahiro Tanaka got the start this afternoon, throwing 96 pitches in 7 innings, giving up 7 hits, a walk, and just 1 run, striking out 6 Detroit batters to earn his 10th win this season. In fact, his terrible inning was in the top of the game. He gave up 3 consecutive singles to load up the bases before allowing a sacrifice fly to score just 1 run. Tanaka held the Tigers to that lone run for the rest of his outing.

Jonathan Holder had a better outing today, throwing just 8 pitches in the 8th inning, before Dellin Betances’ clean 9th inning closed out the game and helped deliver the victory to the home team.

As good as the Yankee pitchers were today, the Tigers’ starter and his relievers actually held the home team to those 2 hits. In fact, their starter held the Yankees hitless and scoreless through the first 4 innings, having a bit of a perfect game, with 7 big strikeouts. However, in the 5th, Miguel Andujar broke his streak with a walk to lead-off the inning. One out later, Gleyber Torres hit his 22nd homer, a 2-run home run into the left field seats to get the Yankees on the board and in the lead.

Despite such a great start, the Tigers opted to go to their bullpen right there in the middle of the 5th. That first reliever promptly loaded up the bases with 2 walks and a hit-by-pitch (welcome to the Bronx, Andrew McCutchen!), but then a pop-up left them stranded. And that would be the last good opportunity the Yankees would get all afternoon.

Final score: 2-1 Yankees

Speaking of the new guy, Andrew McCutchen, clean-shaven and wearing #26, led-off the game and played right field in his Yankees’ debut today. He also got his first foray as part of the famed Roll Call from the Bleacher Creatures, something that made his smile linger for most of the 1st inning. The veteran outfielder should be an easy fan favorite for the fans in the outfield bleachers, much like he was with his former team in Pittsburgh.

It’s September. And with the turn of the calendar page comes the September call-ups, where each team is allowed to expand its daily 25 player roster up to 40 active players. This nicely coincided with both recent trades of McCutchen and Adeiny Hechavarria. They also activated Gary Sanchez off the 10-day disabled list, fully recovered from his recent groin injury.

The Yankees also recalled infielder Tyler Wade and reliever Luis Cessa and selected the contract of reliever Stephen Tarpley from AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. And to make room on the 40-man roster for Tarpley, the Yankees opted to designate outfielder Shane Robinson for assignment.

Of course, that still leaves three big names on the Disabled List — Didi Gregorius (bruised heel), Aaron Judge (fractured wrist), and Aroldis Chapman (knee tendinitis). All three are actively receiving treatments, something the Yankees are hoping will bring them back sooner rather than later. But clearly the recent acquisitions are the Yankees’ way of shoring up their staff in case those lingering issues decide to linger a bit longer.

Go Yankees!

Game 113: NYY vs. CHW — Severino & Stanton sweep Sox (the White ones)

Talk about a reversal of fortune. Before this roadtrip, I was envisioning a rather “battle of the Sox” approach to this week’s blog posts. But after a disastrous stint against the red ones, it’s rather nice to be reset by the white ones. Though the “red ones” keep winning and thus are still quite a bit ahead of the Yankees in the standings.

Luis Severino had a shaky 1st inning to start off what ended up being a pretty decent outing in tonight’s closer against the White Sox. He threw 109 pitches in his 7 innings, gave up 7 hits and 3 runs, and struck out 8 Chicago batters.

In the 1st, he gave up a single, an RBI double, and an RBI single to get them on the board. And a lead-off solo home run in the 5th capped off the Sox’s runs tonight. Then, Chad Green and Jonathan Holder each took an inning to close out the game and keep the Sox from adding to their score.

After the home team got on the board first, the Yankees pounced in the 2nd inning. Torres led-off with a walk, moved to 2nd on Walker’s 1-out single, and then scored on Austin Romine’s single.  Walker then scored on Shane Robinson’s single to tie the game, and Gardner was hit by a pitch to load up the bases. It would fall to Giancarlo Stanton to be the difference-maker in this game, with a big grand slam just to the left of the right field foul pole.

Aaron Hicks added his mark with a lead-off solo home run in the 5th. And other than that, the Yankees just protected their hefty lead for the rest of the game to ensure their win and sweep in Chicago.

Final score: 7-3 Yankees, Yankees sweep series 3-0

A few notes: Tonight’s grand slam was Stanton’s 6th career grand slam, his last one was in 2014. After the less-than-ideal start in the 1st, Severino found his momentum and got the next 13 of 14 batters out through his next 6 innings (except for that allowed homer in the 5th).

While tonight certainly end up in the positive category for the Yankees, the competition between the “Soxes” fell along the same lines as dictated by the standings. And because of the first game last Thursday, the Yankees overall were out-scored by their Sox opponents 34-31 (the Red Sox just drowned them 28-11). If the pattern continues, Yankee fans could potentially reflect “what’s on paper” and have a pretty strong home stand. But that’s relying on “what’s on paper” and not allowing for the unpredictability of baseball and life.

Next up: The Yankees head back home for a long home stand that will include the 20th reunion for the 1998 Championship team. They’ll face a 4-game series against the Rangers, a make-up game against the Mets, then 3 games each with the Rays and Blue Jays. The last series will overlap with the anniversary celebration.

Go Yankees!

Games 102 & 103: KC vs. NYY — Split doubleheader thanks to more rainy days

The Yankees’ game last night was rained out, making it the 9th time that the Yankees have been weather-delayed this season. Fortunately, there was time (and a clear skies kind of forecast) for the next day for the Yankees and Royals to play and split a make-up doubleheader.

Game 1
Luis Severino had yet another bad outing in the regularly scheduled game that became the first game today, earning his 4th loss in an otherwise stellar season. He threw 95 pitches into the 5th innings, gave up 8 hits, a walk, and 6 runs, and struck out 5 Royals’ batters.

In the 3rd, a 1-out double and walk both scored on a long double to get the Royals on the board first. A lead-off single in the 5th ended up at 3rd on a ground-rule double, and then they both scored on a single. The next batter hit a 2-run home run to further the Royals’ lead, and that was it for Severino’s night. Warren came on in relief and sailed his way through the next 8 outs.

The Yankees had no trouble getting on base, but instead finding trouble scoring runs for most of the game. They were held off until the 5th inning, with Hicks’ 2-out single and Giancarlo Stanton’s 2-run home run to get the Yankees on the board. In the 6th, Torres singled, moved to 2nd on Bird’s single, and then scored on Neil Walker’s single. Austin Romine hit into a double play but Bird still scored a run.

But then later in that inning, they loaded up the bases and couldn’t get anyone home once again. In the 7th, Gregorius led-off with a single and then scored on Gleyber Torres’ double. Torres, however, got thrown out trying to stretch his double into a triple. The Yankees continued to put runners in scoring position, but couldn’t chip away any further at the Royals’ early lead.

The Yankees’ later relievers David Robertson and Chasen Shreve had less than ideal outings themselves, but it didn’t matter in the long run as the damage was already done. A 3-run home run in the 8th and a sacrifice fly in the 9th added more runs for the Royals this first game of the day.

Final score for game 1: 10-5 Royals

Game 2
The second game of the day was officially the make-up game. Friday’s game was preceded by a giveaway of a bobblehead featuring CC Sabathia, who happened to be scheduled to pitch and promptly did so in tonight’s game. Sabathia had a decent outing, throwing just 79 pitches into the 5th inning, gave up 6 hits, 2 walks, and 2 runs, and struck out an impressive 8 Royals’ batters.

He gave up a 1-out solo homer in the 3rd, and then loaded up the bases in the 5th. With 2 outs, he gave up another walk to walk in the Royals’ second run of the game. But then Jonathan Holder got a stellar strike out to end the threat. His 6th inning was less heroic, giving up a lead-off single that moved to 2nd on a sacrifice bunt. Chad Green came in and gave up a single to score another run but held the Royals off from further damage.

New Yankee Zach Britton had his own issues in the 7th. After 2 quick outs, he had trouble finding that 3rd out, giving up a double, a single, a walk to load the bases, and another walk to score another Royals’ run. But then Betances and Chapman each had scoreless innings to keep the Royals from adding to their score like in the first game.

Of course, this would mean nothing if the Yankees continued to put runners on base but stranded them there. So, when they struck first in the 1st, things were looking up. Gardner led-off with a single, moved to 2nd on Stanton’s single, then onto 3rd on a fly out, before scoring on Miguel Andujar’s single. Bird was hit by a pitch, which loaded the bases, and Neil Walker’s sacrifice fly scored Stanton. And Shane Robinson hit his first home run as a Yankee, a big 2-out solo shot in the 4th.

After the Royals tied up the game and then took the lead, the Yankees needed another good inning so they wouldn’t end up on the wrong end of today’s games. They got that in the 8th. Greg Bird hit the 2nd pitch of his lead-off at-bat into the Yankees’ bullpen for a solid home run to re-tie up the game. Then the Yankees loaded up the bases (again) with Walker’s double, Romine’s single, and Torres’ walk. It would be Aaron Hicks’ solid sacrifice fly to score Walker, the winning run.

Final score of game 2: 5-4 Yankees

Roster moves: after Aaron Judge was moved to the 10-day DL thanks to his fractured wrist, the Yankees recalled Tyler Wade, who can easily function as a reliable utility man in the infield and outfield. They also activated pitcher JA Happ as the 26th man for today’s doubleheader. Happ will be the starter for tomorrow’s game.

And in order to get down to that magical number of 25 for the roster, the Yankees used tonight’s big trade to do so. In a deal with the Cardinals, the Yankees got infielder Luke Voit and Future Considerations (or cash for their international signings) in exchange for relievers Chasen Shreve and Giovanny Gallegos. Shreve, a favorite in the clubhouse, was on a recent upswing after some pretty disappointing outings earlier this season. Trades area always hard, but sometimes, it’s the best for everyone to shake things up and get a fresh start with a new organization. Best of luck to them all.

Also, it’s Hall of Fame Weekend in Cooperstown, New York. The induction ceremony for the class of 2018 is tomorrow afternoon. While no Yankees are entering the Hall this year, it should be a memorable event, as always, featuring some well-known faces from the other side of the field during some key events in Yankee history. With some of the recent retirements of the stars of the most recent dynasty of Yankees (like the “Core Four”), the next Yankee in the Hall is just a year or two away.

Go Yankees!

Game 15: MIA vs. NYY — #SevySharp in rout

Detroit was rather a disappointing weekend in an unusual way. After their victory on Friday night, the freezing rain and continuous downpour forced Saturday afternoon’s game to be rescheduled to Sunday for a double-header. But then the weather continued to sour and flood the field at Comerica Park. So, the double-header was then rescheduled for their next overlapping free day — June 4. Saturday’s makeup game will be recognized as the first game, and Sunday’s makeup game (including honoring the 71st anniversary of Jackie Robinson’s rookie season) will be the night game.

Instead, the Yankees headed back home to face off against the visiting Marlins starting tonight for a quick 2-game micro-series. And no, a certain minority owner and new executive was not and will not be present for the series. Not that he’d want to see how his team did in tonight’s game. Those in the Steinbrenner box had no such problems tonight.

Luis Severino was dominant in his start tonight, throwing 86 pitches in his 6 scoreless innings, giving up just 1 hit and 1 walk, striking out 8 Miami batters. Severino ended up with his 3rd win already this season. But his next relievers got into a couple of jams and then proved they were capable of getting out them relatively unscathed.

In the 7th, Adam Warren gave up 2 singles and a walk to load up the bases before getting that third out to escape the inning. Chasen Shreve came on for the 8th and his first batter made it safely to base on a fielding error, before loading up the bases with a single and a walk with 1 out. A force out at 2nd allowed that lead runner to score an unearned run. Another walk loaded the bases again, but Shreve got a fly out to end the threat. And that would be the only run the Marlins would score tonight — an unearned run. Dellin Betances closed out the 9th inning, keeping the Marlins to that lone run.

Meanwhile, (and how do I say this nicely?) the Marlins pitching and defense left much to be desired tonight. In the 1st, the Yankees quickly loaded up the bases with Gardner’s lead-off single and 2 walks to Judge and Stanton. Gary Sanchez’s 1-out single kept the bases loaded but scored Gardner. Then Tyler Austin worked a 2-out walk to walk in Judge. Aaron Judge later hit a big 2-out solo home run in the 2nd to add to the score.

In the 3rd, Gregorius led-off with a walk and moved to 2nd on Sanchez’s single before they both scored on Aaron Hicks’ double. After Andujar walked, the Marlins decided their poor starter had enough and went to their bullpen. A quick double play made them think they made the right decision. But then the Yankees came back strong again in the 4th. With 2 outs, Stanton was hit by a pitch and then scored as part of Didi Gregorius’ 2-run home run to add more to the Yankees’ growing lead.

Tyler Austin led-off the 5th with a double and then scored on Miguel Andujar’s double. Torreyes’ single and Gardner’s walk loaded up the bases (with no outs), and Judge’s single scored Andujar. After finally getting 2 outs, Sanchez hit a long single to score the speedy Torreyes and Gardner. And in the 7th, Didi Gregorius hit his 2nd homer of the game, a 1-out solo shot into the Yankees’ bullpen to cap off the Yankees’ rout of the Marlins in Bronx Bomber fashion.

It is worth noting that of the 15 total hits and 8 walks, every Yankees starting player tonight made it on base, most more than once and most helping make that 12 run score possible.

Final score: 12-1 Yankees

That home run in the 2nd was Aaron Judge’s 60th career home run. He is the fastest player to ever reach 60 homers, which he did in 197 games. He supplants Mark McGwire who reached 60 homers in 202 games with the Athletics in 1987-1988. He has also hit safely in 17 games, a continuous streak that is worth watching early this season.

Roster moves (warming up the Scranton Shuttle): the Yankees optioned pitcher Luis Cessa back and sent outfielder Shane Robinson outright to AAA Scranton. Jace Peterson was designated for assignment and elected free agency at the end of the waiting period rather than being outrighted back to the minors, and the gamble was worth it because the Yankees re-signed him and added him to the roster prior to tonight’s game.

Injury updates: Greg Bird is recovering well from his ankle surgery, expecting to be back late May or early June. And Jacoby Ellsbury’s oblique injury is healed, and his hip soreness is healing thanks to treatments and cortisone injections. But plantar fasciitis (often in response to overuse of the foot or overstressing the arch) is plaguing him now. Let me just say, that makes basic things like running and walking rather difficult.

Brandon Drury is still dealing with his migraine issues with anti-inflammatories and specialists. Migraine sufferers learn to deal with a number of debilitating symptoms, and Drury’s blurry vision is probably his worst. He even admitted to stepping into the batter’s box in previous seasons with blurry vision due to his migraines, and if you’ve ever done even batting cages, you can imagine that trying to hit a ball traveling 90+ mph with blurry vision and a pounding headache doesn’t exactly help matters.

One more game against the Marlins before an off-day and then a 4-game series against the Blue Jays and a 4-game series against the Twins for this long 10-game (and 1 off-day) home stand. And tonight was a pretty good start.

Go Yankees!

Game 13: NYY vs. BOS — A rainy night in Fenway

The first half of tonight’s game was played in the middle of a constant rain storm, progressively getting worse until they had to stop the game entirely to wait out until the passing front was finished with its downpour over the Boston area. The Yankees were looking to take this series onto their next one, but the Red Sox wanted last night’s game back and get them back on their winning momentum.

Sonny Gray got the start for tonight’s finale in Fenway, throwing 68 pitches in just over 3 rainy innings, giving up 7 hits, 2 walks, and 6 runs, striking out just 3 batters. In the 2nd, he pitched his way through the line-up, all 9 batters as the Red Sox began their advance. A lead-off single moved to 2nd on a walk, to 3rd on a wild pitch, and then scored on a single. Another walk loaded the bases, and all runners moved up on a sacrifice fly, scoring another run. A messy fielder’s choice attempt and throwing error scored another run, and left 2 runners in scoring position. Another single scored yet another run before Gray found those final 2 outs of the inning to mercifully end the Red Sox’s dominance.

The Red Sox continued their roll in the 3rd. A lead-off double scored on a ground-rule double. A wild pitch on a strikeout allowed the batter to reach safely and the other runner to move to 3rd. After another out, the next batter hit into a little grounder at 2nd to score one more run for the home team.

German came on in relief of Gray and threw a very efficient 39 pitches in his 3 innings, with Kahnle and Warren breezing through their own innings (the 7th and 8th, respectively). All three relievers found the momentum that Gray seemed to lack tonight.

Meanwhile, the Red Sox starter effectively shut down the Yankees, running a no-hitter until Judge hit a lead-off double in the 7th inning. They Yankees just weren’t hitting off him at all. They would, however, hit off his reliever. After a pretty good 8th inning, the Yankees kept him from finding an out in the 9th inning.

Judge worked a walk, and then he and Stanton benefited on 2 errors — a fielding error allowed Stanton to reach safely, a throwing error allowed Judge to land at 3rd. After Gregorius worked a walk, it would be Gary Sanchez for the big hit of the night — a 3-run bases-clearing double to finally get the Yankees on the board. A new reliever for Boston quickly got the 3 outs they needed to close out the game.

Final score: 6-3 Red Sox, Boston wins series 2-1

The rain delay during tonight’s game halted play for 45 minutes, between the 5th and 6th innings, as they waited out the weather. Not too terrible of a delay in light of things. But I cannot imagine the earlier part of the game was all that pleasant for either team. Of course, a better score might have helped the Yankees.

Next up: the Yankees travel to Detroit to face off against the Tigers.

Following up from yesterday’s melee, the league handed down its disciplines for those involved in the fracas. The pitcher who drilled Tyler Austin (Joe Kelly) received a 6-game suspension and a fine, and Tyler Austin received a 5-game suspension and a fine. They are both appealing their punishments. (They do often get reduced or overturned upon appeal, so it’s always worth the effort.)

Boston’s manager (Alex Cora) and Yankees’ 3rd base coach Phil Nevin got into it a bit themselves last night and were also fined as part of the decision today. And 4 players on the Disabled List were fined due to a violation in the rule book about not entering the playing field while on the DL. Those players are 3 Red Sox players and CC Sabathia. I don’t expect any of these players or Cora or Nevin to appeal their fines. (It’s usually upheld, so it’s not usually worth the effort.)

Roster updates: Aaron Hicks is back, finally off the disabled list where he’s been since he injured his right intercostal muscle on Opening Day in Toronto. In his place, the Yankees designated Shane Robinson for assignment. The outfield may be back sooner than expected, so take these small signs as moments of hope.

Go Yankees!

Game 11: NYY vs. BOS — That was just ugly.

“Ugly.” That word got thrown around first tonight somewhere in the 2nd inning. You know that things aren’t really going to get better if you’re using that word so early in the game. And it certainly didn’t.

The Yankees and Red Sox kick off their rivalry this year in this “ugly” game. Oddly, both teams sent up their ace pitchers (who finished 2nd and 3rd for the AL Cy Young Award last year), and they both gave up 8 total hits over their outings. So, I guess we can say safely that the biggest difference tonight was all about the defense. Luis Severino threw 94 pitches in 5 innings, and gave up 5 runs along the way.

Things started off tolerably. In the 1st, Severino gave up a double, a walk, and an RBI single to get the Red Sox on the board. But then it kind of got “ugly”. In the 2nd, a lead-off single and a 1-out single scored on a big triple. That runner then scored on a single to add more to their lead. An obvious example of the defensive issues came in this inning with a bad throwing error to try to get the runner stealing 2nd. And in the 4th, a 1-out walk moved to 3rd on a big double and then scored on a sacrifice fly.

Despite those 8 hits, the Red Sox were able to leave most of those runners stranded on the bases. The only run the Yankees scored had to leave the park to count. So that fell to Aaron Judge in the 5th inning with a huge 2-out solo home run straight up the middle 444 feet.

Tommy Kahnle came in to the game in the 6th inning, but thanks to a bit of sloppy defense and some poorly placed pitches, his struggles were even more drastic. With 1 out, he loaded the bases with a double and 2 walks. Another double scored 2 runners, and a sacrifice fly scored another. After giving up another walk, the Yankees went back to their bullpen. Chasen Shreve ran into his own issues, hitting his first batter to load up the bases again. A fielding error allowed all runners to be safe and another run to score, and a walk moved up everyone for another scored run. And then it would be an 83 mph splitter down the middle that would end up in the Green Monster seats for a grand slam to cap off their night.

Shreve had a much better 7th inning, getting 3 solid strikeouts. That strong comeback was all the momentum Luis Cessa needed to breeze his way through the 8th in just 12 pitches. The Yankees were hitting tonight, just not enough and not terribly well. It’s also worth noting that of the 14 scored runs, only 8 of them were earned thanks to all those errors.

Final score: 14-1 Red Sox

Injury update: in some much-needed good new today, the Yankees sent Aaron Hicks to his rehab assignment, joining AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. His outing went well, and Hicks felt like his old self. If things continue to go well, he could join the Yankees in Detroit for that series this weekend.

Roster moves: the Yankees signed minor leaguer Shane Robinson to a professional contract, putting him in tonight’s game, starting in center field and getting a solid hit tonight. To make room for him on the roster, they designated Jace Peterson for assignment.

In little bit of side news: the Yankees and Mets made a minor league trade of outfielders that also has legacy undertones. The Yankees sent Kendall Coleman to the Mets, and the Mets sent the Yankees L.J. Mazzilli. And if you’re wondering why that sounds familiar, it’s because he’s Lee Mazzilli’s son.

And if that name sounds familiar: Lee Mazzilli (the dad) played mostly for the Mets in his 14 year career and was part of the 1986 World Series team. He also played about half the 1982 season with the Yankees. He later was a coach with the Yankees in 2000-2003, served as the Orioles manager in 2004-2005, and then came back to the Yankees in 2006 before becoming a Special Advisor to the Yankees. His oldest daughter Lacey also is in Yankee Universe as part of the on-air talent for Yankees On Demand, which films special segments for the network and in-house production.

In other words, the Yankees just got themselves another Mazzilli. How L.J. develops is too early to say, but for now, it’s a fun trivia moment for long-time Yankee fans.

Go Yankees!

Spring Game 32: NYY vs. ATL — Chilly, soggy Monday in “The Big Peach”

What a change moving Spring Training north 474 miles (about 7 hours) to Atlanta. And yes, “the Big Peach” is one of those random nicknames for the city. My apologies to the family and friends who reside there for such an awful nickname. But then again, I grew up in “the Big Guava“. Let’s just stop naming things after fruit. New York barely tolerates that; it’s not worth copying.

Anyway, along the drive to the city more commonly known (and rather ironic tonight) as “Hot-lanta”, the temperature dropped nearly 40-degrees, with first pitch tonight coming in on the thermostat at 47° F at SunTrust Park. The newest professional stadium in the MLB stable (opening just last year) hosted about half its capacity for the diehard fans willing to brave the cold and the eventual rain that plagued tonight’s match-up between the hometown Braves and the Yankees. But the faithful were treated to a pretty good game.

Sonny Gray got the start tonight, throwing 60 pitches in his 5 innings, giving up just 3 hits and a run and striking out 7 batters. His lone allowed run came in the 4th when a lead-off double moved to 3rd on a ground out and then scored on another one. Other than that, the Yankee pitchers held off the Braves’ battery for most of the game, with the bullpen showing off their fresh arms and breezing through most of Atlanta’s lineup — Kudos to Betances, Robertson, Holder, Heller, and Chapman who dominated tonight’s game and helped contribute to the impressive total of 14 strikeouts.

Meanwhile, the Yankees found moments in the Braves’ starter’s night to take advantage of. With 2 outs in the 1st, Stanton worked a walk and then scored as part of Didi Gregorius’ 2-run home run to get the Yankees on the board early. In the 3rd, Judge worked a 1-out walk and then scored with Giancarlo Stanton’s 2-run big home run to the 2nd deck in left field to double the Yankees’ lead.

The Braves’ starter came out of the game after struggling through his 3 innings, but the bullpen was much sharper, fending off the Yankees for much of the game at that point. Until the 8th inning. Trey Amburgey made it safely to 1st on a missed catch error and booked it to 2nd on a wild pitch. He then scored on Shane Robinson’s 2-out double to cap off the Yankees’ scoring with an unearned run.

Final score: 5-1 Yankees

This means that the Yankees finish the Spring 18-13-1 (or .581 season average). And I will be posting my reflections, the final standings, and a recap of Spring 2018 tomorrow. So check back for more.

Injury update: after seeing a foot specialist today, the Yankees announced that Greg Bird will undergo surgery tomorrow morning to remove a bone spur that has broken off outside his ankle. If you think that sounds painful, you’re right and it’s why he’s not been playing these last few games. He will need about 6-8 weeks of recovery following the surgery, thus starting another season on the DL. But the depth chart is stacked this year with the likes of Walker, Wade, Drury, Austin, and even Romine to cover while Bird gets healthy again.

Okay, first official 2018 game is this Thursday afternoon (3:37 PM EST). The Yankees kick off the season with a 4-game series in Toronto.

Go Yankees!