Game 38: OAK vs. NYY — Another disappointing loss and still MLB leaders

Well, that was… disappointing. After such a long win streak, it’s just disappointing (there is no other word, really) to drop 2 games in a row, and that “come from behind” momentum they got used to during their streak wasn’t coming on as strong as it did just last week.

Sonny Gray got the start in the series opener against the visiting Athletics. And his struggles this year seem to continue as he gave the A’s an early lead that sent the Yankees into playing catch-up all game. Gray threw 93 pitches in his 5 innings, gave up 9 hits, 3 walks, and 5 runs, and struck out just 2 Oakland batters.

In the 2nd, he gave up a lead-off solo shot to start the run-scoring. Then after allowing a single, a 2-run home run caused the sold-out crowd to start groaning. But then he got the 3 outs in fairly quick succession. And then it was the 3rd inning, and Gray gave up 3 consecutive singles, the last of which scored a run. Then despite later loading up the bases, he got of that jam with a great defensive fly out. And a double led-off the 4th, moved to 3rd on a single, and then scored on a ground out.

Meanwhile, the Yankees were held off by the Athletics’ starter for most of the game, so they grabbed their offensive opportunities in small doses like Gleyber Torres’ 1-out solo home run in the 3rd. And in the 5th, Andujar reached 1st on a fielding error, Gardner worked a 2-out walk, and then they both scored on Aaron Judge’s 3-run home run into the right field seats to put the Yankees within a single run of the Athletics’ lead.

David Hale came on in relief of Gray in the 6th for 3 inning and had his own struggles, giving up a 2-out solo home run in the 6th and then a 1-out solo homer in the 8th. David Robertson was called on to close out the 9th, but even he had trouble. With 1 out, he loaded up the bases with 2 walks and a failed fielder’s choice so that a double cleared all the bases and eased the A’s into a big victory.

The Yankees had a minor hope for a rally in the 7th inning. With the starter out and a new pitcher on the mound, Andujar and Romine each singled and moved into scoring position on Torres’ sacrifice bunt. After a new reliever came in, Gardner worked a walk in just 4 pitches to load the bases. Then Aaron Judge stepped in, and the Bronx came alive with hope, only to be slightly dimmed due to the reliever ending up walking Judge and thus Andujar in for an easy run. Another new reliever and 2 outs later, the bases were still loaded and the rally stranded and stalled.

Final score: 10-5 Athletics

Last year, June 29 to be exact, the Yankees called up a young prospect Dustin Fowler to make his MLB debut. In the very 1st inning in Chicago, the rookie outfielder slammed against the back wall and ruptured a tendon in his knee that would require surgery, ending his 2017 season. In the process of his recovery, the Yankees orchestrated a trade with today’s opponents, the Athletics, that sent prospects Fowler, Mateo, and Kaprielian to Oakland in exchange for tonight’s pitcher Sonny Gray (and international bonus slot money). Tonight, Fowler finally got an at-bat at Yankee Stadium, or actually 5, in which he also got a hit and a run scored.

Injury updates: Drury, Bird, and McKinney are all in the midst of their rehab assignments and doing quite well. As far as returning, there doesn’t seem to be any rush because despite tonight’s outcome (and yesterday’s), the Yankees are still in 1st place in the AL East and in all of baseball. Sure, they’re sharing the spot with the Red Sox, but 1st is 1st.

Go Yankees!

Game 104: DET vs. NYY — Yankees remain strong, last-minute trade grab

Today was the final day of the big MLB trade deadline, and even the Yankees benefited from some last-minute trade deals. But at the expense of some pretty great prospects. More after the game recap, as they still had to play a game in the Bronx.

The Yankees continued their home stand with this 3-game midweek series against the visiting Tigers. The Yankees are hoping to keep their winning momentum going with this new series, so it was only natural to look to Luis Severino to start tonight’s game. Severino threw 116 pitches in just 5 innings, gave up 4 hits, 3 walks, and a run, and still struck out 8 Detroit batters.

The still hashtag-less Severino had his toughest inning was the 4th. With 2 outs, he struggled to get that final out, giving up a single that scored on an RBI double. The Yankees’ defense also earned their 2 fielding errors that inning, though it ultimately didn’t affect the score. It just helped push up his pitch count, which was really the roughest part of his outing.

Tommy Kahnle came on in relief for the 6th inning and had a bit of his own struggles. His lead-off batter was hit by a pitch, moved to 2nd on a single, and then scored on a 2-out single to double the Tigers’ score.

Betances had better luck in the 7th, keeping the Tigers from adding to their score, and Jonathan Holder kept things smooth in the 8th. Holder’s 9th inning, however, wasn’t so smooth. With just 1 out on the board, Holder loaded up the bases with consecutive singles and a hit-by-pitch, before handing over the ball to Aroldis Chapman. A fielder’s choice (or rather a late effort at a double play) scored just one more run for the Tigers before a 3-pitch strikeout ended the Tigers’ last-minute rally.

Meanwhile, the Yankees took their opportunities when they found them. In the 4th, they loaded up the bases with a walk, a fielding error, and a walk. Chase Headley’s double scored 2 runs, and then Todd Frazier’s single scored 2 more. All before the Yankees got a single out that inning, and suddenly the Yankees leapt ahead of the Tigers.

Aaron Judge added an extra cushion to the lead with a 1-out solo home run in the 5th into the left field seats. In the 7th, lead-off batter Ellsbury was hit by a pitch, stole 2nd, and then scored on Clint Frazier’s giant triple. After Judge worked a walk, the Tigers pulled their starter and went to their bullpen. Gary Sanchez’s sacrifice fly scored Frazier for the final Yankees’ run of the night.

Final score: 7-3 Yankees.

Scranton Shuttle: before the game, for fresh arms in the bullpen, the Yankees optioned pitcher Luis Cessa to AAA Scranton and recalled Jonathan Holder, who ended up in tonight’s game.

Okay, the big trade of the day has the Yankees picking up a new pitcher for the starting rotation — Sonny Gray, a 27-year-old starter from the Athletics. In trade, the Yankees sent 3 of their prospects — outfielder Dustin Fowler, infielder Jorge Mateo, and pitcher James Kaprielian. Yes, Fowler and Kaprielian are on the DL recovering from surgeries, which should tell you how valuable both teams think of these players.

Sonny Gray was a first round draft pick in 2011 for the Athletics, after pitching at Vanderbilt. Gray came up in the A’s organization, making his MLB debut in 2013 and the 2015 All-Star team. He’s had a bit of a rough season last year on and off the DL, and another small one early this season. But he’s got the history of consistency and the youth that the Yankees really need for some potential long-term players.

The Yankees also picked up extra money for the international draft market (also called “Future Considerations”) on this trade. They picked up even more when they sent pitching prospect Yefry Ramirez to the Orioles. This is good for the Yankees as they continue to expand internationally and pick up more players in a broader market.

Go Yankees!

Game 79: NYY vs. HOU — Sometimes not even a Grand Slam can save a game

It’s a Saturday night in Houston, and things were looking up for the Yankees thanks to a strong start by rookie pitcher Jordan Montgomery. Actually, neither team got on the board until the second half of the game, leaving both teams battling it out for most of the game.

Montgomery threw 87 pitches into the 6th inning, giving up just 5 hits, a walk, and 3 runs, striking out 4 Houston batters. So in the 5th, Montgomery gave up his only walk, a lead-off walk that scored as part of a 2-run home run to get the Astros on the board. Then in the bottom of the 6th, he gave up a 1-out solo home run. After a double kept the Astros alive, Montgomery handed the game over to Chad Green.

Green promptly struck out the final 2 batters of the 6th and then breezed his way through the 7th inning to keep the Yankees in the lead. Green set things up for the Yankees to keep working and clear the way for the final innings for the closing duo.

As Montgomery and Green were clearing the way defensively, the Yankees offense finally kicked in, much like they did last night, in the 6th inning. Clint Frazier got his first MLB hit, a double, to lead off the inning. (More on him later.) Frazier moved to 3rd on Gardner’s single. With 2 runners on base, the Astros’ starter’s night was done. Which turned out to be a great thing for the Yankees.

Ellsbury worked a walk to load up the bases, and Gary Sanchez’s single scored Fraizer (his first MLB run-scored). With the bases still loaded, it would be Didi Gregorius to hit his 10th home run of the season, a monster grand slam (his first of his career) to give the Yankees a nice lead over the Astros.

Then after an out (the first one of the inning), Torreyes singled and the Astros went to a new pitcher, as Torreyes worked his way around the bases, stealing both 2nd and 3rd before a strikeout left him stranded. In the 7th, Clint Frazier added one more run for the Yankees with a lead-off solo home run deep into the left field seats. His first MLB home run, his second MLB hit (and of the night).

And things were good for the Yankees, but then it all got sticky in the 8th inning. Dellin Betances, on the mound now, had some trouble getting those necessary 3 outs. After a strikeout, he gave up a walk who then stole 2nd and 3rd before scoring on a ground out. A solo home run put the Astros within a run of the Yankees’ lead. Betances then gave up a walk and then tried to pick that runner off 1st, but a missed catch error allowed him to get to 2nd base and then steal 3rd. After another walk, the Yankees called in Aroldis Chapman for what should be a 4-out save.

It really didn’t turn out that way after Chapman gave up a 2-RBI double that gave the Astros the lead. And the Yankees didn’t do much in the 9th inning to make a comeback. After 2 outs, Gardner singled and ended up getting caught trying to stretch it into a double, which ended the game in a single tag.

Final score: 7-6 Astros

Roster moves: The Yankees transferred Dustin Fowler from the 10-day to the 60-day disabled list, as he continues to recover from his emergency knee surgery. They also optioned Miguel Andujar back to AAA Scranton (I hope he’s getting airline miles for all this travel back and forth). And they selected the contract of Clint Frazier AAA Scranton.

Clint Frazier found out yesterday about his call-up, making a phone call to his family who then traveled to Houston (from their home in Georgia) to watch their son make a pretty great debut, despite the Yankees’ late loss. Who knows how long Frazier will be in pinstripes with the big guys, but like a few of his other Scranton teammates, he can cling to a stellar debut and help contribute his small part to the 2017 season.

Go Yankees!

Game 78: NYY vs. HOU — A “Gardy Party”

I think my favorite tweet about tonight’s game was the Yankees’ “Everyone’s invited to a Gardy party!” It’s a terrible attempt at a pun, of course, thanks in part to Yankees’ radio announcer John Sterling and his infamous old-school radio calls. But it was certainly a nice wrap up for the offense that was Brett Gardner tonight in the opening game against the Astros.

Of course, Gardner’s push had huge support thanks to starter Michael Pineda, who threw 91 pitches in 6 innings, giving up 7 hits, no walks, and 3 runs (only 2 earned), and striking out 3 Houston batters. In the 1st, a lead-off double moved to 3rd on a ground out and then scored on a sacrifice fly to give the Astros an early lead. With 1 out and 2 runners in scoring position in the 4th, a ground out scored the first and a single scored the second to give the Astros a nice lead over the Yankees.

Recently called-up Bryan Mitchell came on for the final third of the game for the Yankees, giving them the kind of solid, consistent long-term relief they’ve been needing for a few weeks. He threw just 30 pitches in 3 innings and still managed to give up a run, in his middle inning, the 8th. A lead-off double ended up at 3rd on a fielding error and then scored on a ground out.

And that wouldn’t be good enough if the Astros were playing like one of the best teams in baseball (as they are), but the Yankees seemed to remember that they’re also one of the best teams in baseball. And it would be Brett Gardner (of course) to start the whole thing for the Yankees with a lead-off double in the 3rd and then scoring on Didi Gregorius’ 2-out double to tie up the game, at that point.

Down 3-1, the Yankees began their rally and eventual rout in the 6th inning. Gregorius led-off with a single and moved to 2nd on Romine’s 1-out walk. The Astros’ starter was done, but the bullpen wasn’t any better. Ronald Torreyes’ single scored Gregorius and then after another strikeout, the rally began. Chris Carter single scored Romine, Gardner’s single scored Torreyes (to finally put the Yankees in the lead), and Jacoby Ellsbury’s single scored Carter as an error moved runners into scoring position. Aaron Judge’s walk was on a wild pitch that scored Gardner. That ended the 6th inning run rally as a new reliever found the final out of the inning.

But it would be the 7th inning that would leave everyone talking. The Yankees loaded up the bases with singles to Headley and Romine and a walk to Torreyes. Wade hit into a ground out that the Astros kicked into defensive gear and got the best out at home. A new reliever got a strikeout but then got Gardner to work up a full count before he sent a 82 mph slider into the right field seats for a home run, his 3rd career grand slam to ensure a Yankees victory tonight.

To add just a pinch more, the Yankees took advantage of the Astros sending in a position player to close out the game in the 9th. Torreyes and Wade each worked a walk. Carter’s double scored Torreyes, Gardner’s sacrifice fly score Wade, and Ellsbury’s ground out scored Carter before the position player reliever got home run leader Aaron Judge to fly out to end the inning and set up the Yankees for the big win.

Final score: 13-4 Yankees.

Roster moves: Before tonight’s game, the Yankees put Dustin Fowler on the 10-day disabled list with his ruptured right patellar tendon injury (more below) and optioned reliever Ronald Herrera back to AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre. In their place, the Yankees recalled tonight’s long closer Bryan Mitchell and the hero rookie from two days ago Miguel Andujar from AAA Scranton.

A few hours before tonight’s game, the Yankees all crowded into Girardi’s office to Facetime with their injured teammate Dustin Fowler in a Chicago hospital. Fowler will be discharged from the hospital and sent to New York to begin his roughly 6 months of recovery. It’s a bit shorter than a torn ACL, but a knee injury, regardless of how intense, is never an easy road to recovery. Fowler deserves a chance to show what a great player he can be in the big leagues, and at this point, it looks like maybe next year he gets that chance.

Go Yankees!

Game 77: CHW vs. NYY — Very late start and 2 big losses

Normally, games that take place in the Central Time zone start an hour behind normal game start times. Which is fine, even for evening games, for those of us still on Eastern Time. I always complain about evening games on the West Coast because they’re 3 hours behind. But by 10pm tonight (Eastern Time and the normal start time for evening West Coast games if you live in EST), the Yankees were still in the middle of a rain delay in Chicago due to a lingering squall line that seemed to want to soak the area and wouldn’t leave for at least another area.

I went ahead and looked at the schedule and found a potential reschedule date that would fit both teams, but the consensus seemed to be wanting to get the game over with. Well, maybe it wasn’t, but that’s what they did.

Anyway, so with a start time of 11pm (EST), that meant there was a rain delay of 2 hours and 50 minutes, which led to a 3 hour and 1 minute game. And if you’re doing math, that means the last out of the 9th inning happened at 2:01am (EST). Thank goodness it wasn’t one of those extra innings games. I’m guessing neither team will have an early call tomorrow before their games.

Anyway, the Yankees played their final game against the White Sox, with Luis Cessa getting the late start tonight. Cessa threw 89 pitches into the 5th inning, giving up 5 hits, 3 walks, and 4 runs (though only 2 were earned), and struck out just one Chicago batter. In the 2nd, with 2 outs and a runner on 2nd, a fielding error allowed the batter to make it safely to 1st and the runner to score the White Sox’s first run. A single then scored another run. And in the 4th, with 2 outs and runners in scoring position, a double doubled the White Sox’s score.

Shreve closed out the 5th for Cessa in just 6 pitches and began the momentum that would last the rest of the game and put the bullpen back in their dominant position we knew from most of the season. Herrera, Clippard, and Webb sailed their way through the 6th, 7th, and 8th innings, adding 5 strikeouts.

The Yankees actually got on the board first. Gardner led-off the game with a single, moved to 2nd on Judge’s walk, and then scored on a force attempt and fielding error. Ellsbury led-off the 4th with a walk, moved to 2nd on Romine’s 1-out single, and then scored on Ronald Torreyes’ 2-out single. Ellsbury led-off the 6th with a beautiful triple (thanks to his speediness around those bases) and then scored on Austin Romine’s ground out.

The Yankees were also faced with a tight bullpen (including 2 former Yankees) who kept them from adding to their score and handed the White Sox their second victory of the series. (Oddly, both teams only “earned” 2 runs each, which is fitting for a series they evenly split.)

Final score: 4-3 White Sox, White Sox and Yankees split the series 2-2.

Roster moves (hang on, there’s a lot): Tyler Austin was put on the 10-day disabled list due to his right hamstring bruise, and Greg Bird was transferred from the 10 to 60-day DL due to his right angle bruise (which unfortunately effectively ends his season). To make some room on the roster, the Yankees designated Mason Williams for assignment (though I expect him to remain with the organization) and optioned Miguel Andujar back to AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (more in a moment). The Yankees selected the contracts of Chris Carter (told you he’d be back) and Dustin Fowler and put them in the starting lineup tonight.

Now, when news broke of Andujar’s being sent back down after last night’s amazing debut, it pretty much broke the internet of Yankees Universe. I think people were hoping for a great rest of the season from the 22-year-old rookie. And with recent issues, I don’t imagine we’ll not see him again (and in the future on a more permanent basis). But the Yankees (specifically Girardi) wanted to see him playing 3rd base every day, and that’s not going to happen with Headley currently filling that spot.

Now, in even worse news for Yankee prospects, tonight was the MLB debut of Dustin Fowler. In the bottom of the 1st, he was playing right field, scheduled to lead-off the top of the 2nd, when he ran at full speed to run down a fly ball. He slammed into a low fence, the electrical box there, and a railing, nearly flipping over it into the crowd. He hobbled away, hopping a bit on his left leg before collapsing on the warning track. This was not a good sign.

The Yankees surrounded their teammate, and the medical staff called for a cart and stretcher. There was no way Fowler was leaving the field on his own two feet. Later, the medical team at the field diagnosed his injury as an “open rupture of the patellar tendon in the right knee”, and sent him into immediate surgery to repair it at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, performed by White Sox team doctor Charles A. Bush-Joseph.

On a side note, Fowler’s parents found out too late about his debut and couldn’t make it to Chicago (from their home in Georgia) in time and were going to meet him and the team in Houston for the weekend series. (But I bet they’re in Chicago now.)

Our prayers are with Fowler as he heals and recovers and aims to get back to baseball as soon as humanly possible.

And in a completely different thought line, while the Yankees were battling the White Sox about the 3rd inning, the fan voting for the All-Star Game closed. At the last count, Aaron Judge was in the lead among AL votes and for the outfielders, but other Yankees were still in the running as well. All the starters will be revealed on Sunday night (at 7pm on ESPN). After the coaches fill out the rest of their ASG roster, the final fan vote will begin to select among 5 nominated players per league.

Go Yankees!

Spring Game 35: NYY vs. ATL — New digs, unearned runs, & hope

Well, I’m sure the Braves are happy to start their time in SunTrust Park on a win. The Yankees held a 14-2 record (including playoffs) at Turner Field (the best in the majors against the Braves, actually), so perhaps tonight’s special game to inaugurate the Braves’ new stadium is a sign of things to come for them.

The Yankees certainly had a bit of a struggle in just a few moments that made all the difference in tonight’s game. Michael Pineda got the start, going 5 innings and getting 6 solid strikeouts in the process. Pineda’s struggle happened in the 3rd inning. With 2 outs and 2 runners on base, a big 3-run home run got the Braves on the board in a big way.

In the 6th, Chapman and Layne each took a batter, and then Dellin Betances came on. But he gave up consecutive singles and struggled to get out of the inning. So it was on to Jonathan Holder, who also found that 3rd out elusive. He walked his first batter, and the next one reached on a sloppy fielding error to score a run. Another walk scored another run before a solid double cleared the bases to add 3 more runs for the Braves. Then finally, Holder got the final batter to fly out to get out of the inning.

None of the Braves’ runs scored in the 6th inning were considered “earned” because of the error, but all of them counted for their win. Which is unfortunate as Mitchell, Shreve, and Heller split the 7th and 8th innings and all three had flawless outings.

But it wasn’t like the Yankees were silent on their end of things. In the 3rd, the Yankees actually struck first. Sanchez hit a 2-out double, followed by Greg Bird hitting a big 2-run home run (the first one in SunTrust Park, to add to that bit of trivia for you baseball nerds).

In the 6th, with 2 runners on base (and no outs), Dustin Fowler’s double scored both. But then despite loading the bases with a single and hit-by-pitch, the Braves pulled it together to keep the Yankees from taking advantage of that opportunity with some pretty good defense. Chris Carter capped off the Yankees’ scoring with a 1-out solo home run in the 7th.

Final score: 8-5 Braves

While it may have been a good sign for the Braves, it’s not exactly a great sign for the Yankees as they head back to Tampa for Sunday’s opener against the Rays. But then again, now everything is wiped clean and everyone starts again at zeroes. It’s always an odd moment when everyone’s batting average and ERA and stats are all the same, and everyone starts on equal footing.

For a brief moment in time, it’s still anyone’s game. And every team has a 1-in-30 chance of being the World Champions this season. Anything is possible. Seriously, even the Brewers’ fan I talked to tonight has a chance that she’ll be rooting for them in October. I mean, I wouldn’t personally place my own money on such a chance, but like I said, anything is possible.

And because of that, I’m willing to put my heart behind the pinstripes. Now and always. And I’m ready for a great season once again.

Go Yankees!

Spring Game 29: PHI vs. NYY — Pulling it all together in the end

Players don’t win games, teams do. It’s why the concept of teamwork is vital to team sports like baseball. So every player must do their part, the best to be part of that team in order to do something good — like win games.

CC Sabathia got the start today against the visiting Phillies, pitching into the 6th inning. Sabathia had a lone sticky inning, but really came up strong for most of the game. Part of this was due to the support of his teammates behind him. Sabathia gave up 9 hits and a walk over his tenure on the mound, and struck out just 1 Phillies batter.

In the 2nd inning, Sabathia faced 8 batters and had trouble putting together those 3 outs. After getting 3 strong outs in the 1st inning, he followed that up with another one to kick off the inning, but then he gave up 2 singles, a wild pitch, and a walk to load up the bases. Another single scored the 2 runs for the Phillies, and one more single loaded up the bases again. The next batter hit a dribbler to 3rd base and Headley made the play at home to stop the scoring before Sanchez fired it to 1st just a hair late to keep the bases loaded. The final batter hit into a short grounder to get the runner at 2nd for the force and get the Yankees out of trouble.

Thankfully, those 2 runs would be the only runs the Phillies scored this afternoon. Mostly because of the stellar pitching from Dellin Betances, who closed out the 6th inning, and Luis Severino, who cemented his spot in the rotation with 3 flawless innings and 5 nasty strikeouts to freeze the Phillies’ offense.

The Yankees’ offense was up against a pretty good pitcher today, who certainly held the Yankees off for most of the game during his strong time on the mound, into the 7th inning. His immediate reliever continued the strong pitching. Both of these pitchers could rely on their infield especially to make the sharp plays to turn the Yankees’ hits into routine ground outs. The Yankees had a single opportunity in the 3rd inning after Hicks worked the Yankees’ lone walk of the game to lead-off the inning. Judge followed him up with a single and then ended up at 2nd when the next batter hit into a double play (getting Hicks at 3rd and the out at 1st). But Judge would go on to score from 2nd on Brett Gardner’s nice single to get the Yankees on the board.

And on into the bottom of the 9th, they went. With a new pitcher on the mound for the Phillies, the Yankees pulled it all together to make a difference. Avelino led-off with a single and then scored on Castillo’s big double to tie up the game. Then down 2 outs, Amburgey stepped up and hit a solid single to score Castillo (thanks to a really bad throw to the plate too) for a wonderful walk-off win.

Final score: 3-2 Yankees

Player of the Game: I really can’t make this call today for a few reasons. First, we’re in the final week of games, so a lot of the young guys that qualify for this category are now reassigned to minor league camp (more below). And second, today’s game was the perfect example of many of the players contributing to make it work. And I guess today’s POTG would go to the team. With Severino on the mound for the final third of the game, the players had the opportunity to show what it meant to work together in the field. And in the final inning, they collaborated to tie up the game and then win it in a walk-off. Everyone worked together, so everyone won.

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Honoring the 2016 AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders for their Championship Season, Steinbrenner Field, March 24, 2017 [photo courtesy of author]
And it’s no surprise really because before today’s game, the Yankees honored the 2016 AAA Scranton/Wilkes-Barre team, who won the International League championship, the Governor’s Cup, and the AAA National Championship last year, with a special video recap of their season and then presented last year’s roster with their championship rings and had the championship trophy on display at Steinbrenner Field. Last year’s roster included Tyler Austin, Johnny Barbato, Luis Cessa, Aaron Judge, Brady Lail, Pete Kozma, Rob Refsnyder, Gary Sanchez, Mason Williams, and Nick Swisher. (No wonder they won!)

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The Champion 2016 RailRiders & their new hardware [photo courtesy of author]
And in some roster moves today: prior to today’s game, the Yankees optioned reliever Luis Cessa to AAA Scranton and reassigned him to minor league camp. Joining him there were infielder Ji-Man Choi, outfielders Dustin Fowler, Clint Frazier, and Billy McKinney, and pitcher Jason Gurka. They also received reliever Tyler Jones as a Rule 5 Draft return from the Diamondbacks, who was assigned to AAA Scranton and minor league camp. (A Rule 5 Draft return is when a player is selected by another team as part of a deal, but then because he isn’t signed formally by that team, he is returned back to his original team.)

Go Yankees!